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YOKE (OPLECH'E)

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YOKE (OPLECH'E)

Made by: Unknown

Currently in storage


About this object

This fragment is from the collar at the back of a dalmatic with a small portion of the parts that go over the shoulders. The background is a dark yellow colored satin, lined with a coarse handwoven linen. There are five silver repousse plaques affixed to the satin, a cherubim at the top and two seraphim to the left and two to the right. In the center was another figure now missing. The rest of the fragment is covered with an elaborate pattern of embroidery in seed pearls and semiprecious stones and glass pastes and seven ornaments on gilt metal and set with red and green cabochons. The embroidery is made by tacking to the background two white cords outlined on each side by a smaller gilt cord to form the desired pattern. Then to the white cords are attached the seed pearls and the pieces of mother of pearl simulating baroque pearls and the semiprecious stones and glass pastes, thus giving the desired pattern, The semiprecious stones are mostly sapphires and pink quartz beads, thus indicating that they were doubtless pats of gifts to the church or monastery in the form of earrings or necklaces which were broken up for the purpose of making the embroidery.

Category:
costume, liturgical
Object name:
YOKE (OPLECH'E)
Made from:
Satin -- seed pearls -- stones -- brass -- wax? -- cotton cording -- paste stones -- silk -- burlap -- seed beads -- gold thread -- hemp -- silver -- 18th century paper.
Made in:
Russia
Date made:
18th c.
Size:
16 1/2 × 32 11/16 in. (41.9 × 83 cm)

Detailed information for this item

Catalog number:
44.14
Class:
VESTMENT
Signature marks:
inscription 9547 Handwritten in purple ink on reverse, near Hillwood acc. number This is probably an inventory number, although it is unclear if it is from the pre- or post-Revolutionary eras. inscription [Illegible] Extensive inscriptions in 18thc. hand on paper lining the yoke. See detail photos in object file for sample images.
Credit line:
Bequest of Marjorie Merriweather Post, 1973