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BRATINA

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BRATINA

Made by: Unknown

On view in: Pavilion


About this object

A "bratina," a traditional bulbous-shaped bowl, was used for toasts at Russian ceremonial dinners. Such bowls often bear inscriptions, as this one does: "Bratina of an Honest Man, Drink from it to your Health." This form, usually embellished with strapwork (or interlace design), and leaf and vine design, went out of fashion around 1700, when tall goblets made of silver or glass replaced it.

Of traditional bulbous shape, narrowing at the top, flaring slightly at the lip; on an applied low pedestal foot with a moulded band of leaf-shaped motifs alternating with small irregular swags; on the plain body three shaped panels engraved with floral vine scrolls; similar engraving on wide band at top alternating with three panels of Slavonic lettering translated as "Bratina of an honest man, Drink from it to [your] health."

Category:
silverwork
Object name:
BRATINA
Made from:
Silver gilt
Made in:
RUSSIA
Date made:
Early 17th c.
Size:
14 × 12.4 cm (5 1/2 × 4 7/8 in.)

Detailed information for this item

Catalog number:
12.581
Class:
SILVER
Signature marks:
inscription Briatinia dobria Inscribed on wide band immediately below lip. (Part 1 of 3) The inscription drops consonants and vowels. The phrase would be transliterated fully as: "Bratina dobrogo" The full text would be "Bratina dobrogo cheloveka. Pitii z neia na zdraviia." Trans: Bratina of an honest man. Drink from it to [your/his] health. inscription chvkia Pitii Inscribed on wide band immediately below lip. (Part 2 of 3) The inscription drops consonants and vowels. In modern Russian transliteration, it would be rendered as "cheloveka. Piti" The full inscription would be transliterated as: "Bratina dobrogo cheloveka. Pitii z neia na zdraviia." Trans: Bratina of an honest man. Drink from it to [your/his] health. inscription z neia nia zd[r]iavia Inscribed on wide band immediately below lip. (Part 2 of 3) The inscription drops consonants and vowels. In modern Russian transliteration, it would be rendered as "z neia nia zdraviia" or "s neia na zdraviia." The full inscription would be transliterated as: "Bratina dobrogo cheloveka. Pitii z neia na zdraviia." Trans: Bratina of an honest man. Drink from it to [your/his] health.
Credit line:
Museum Purchase, 1987
Featured in publication:
"A Taste for Splendor: Russian Imperial and European Treasures from the Hillwood Museum","Exuberance of Meaning: The Art Patronage of Catherine the Great (1762-1769)","Russian Silver in America: Surviving the Melting Pot","Hillwood Museum & Gardens: Marjorie Merriweather Post's Art Collector's Personal Museum","Hillwood: Thirty Years of Collecting, 1977-2007"