What's in Bloom

Set on twenty-five acres adjacent to Rock Creek Park, Hillwood’s Gardens contain a diverse and fascinating array of plants. Fall is here but the summer displays are at their peak of color in the garden! 

Colchicum autumnale

Colchicum autumnale  are commonly referred to as the autumn crocus, but they are not related to crocus at all.

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Ballon Plant Milkweed (Asclepias physocarpa or Gomphocarpus physocarpus)

Ballon Plant Milkweed (Asclepias physocarpa or Gomphocarpus physocarpus) is a native milkweed of South Africa and is one of the more favored host plants of Monarch butterflies. 

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Hybrid Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia indica)

Hybrid Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) Large shrub with bright flowers and glossy green leaves 

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Brassavola orchid (Brassavola nodosa ‘Little Stars’)

Brassavola orchid (Brassavola nodosa ‘Little Stars’) This charming, night-fragrant orchid is on display in the greenhouse.

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Gentian Hybrid (Gentiana x 'True Blue')

Gentian Hybrid (Gentiana x 'True Blue') is blue flowering perennial that was breed to have a longer bloom season. 

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Waterlily (Nymphaea x 'Colordo')

Waterlily (Nymphaea x 'Colordo') There are dozens of species of waterlily, known for their large, oval green leaves and slightly fragrant blooms that float above the water.  

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Yellow Canna Lily (Canna x generalis 'Tropical Yellow') Spectacular yellow blooms with rose colored flecks provide summer-long tropical flair. 

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Autumn is here!

  • Colchicum autumnale are commonly referred to as the autumn crocus, but they are not related to crocus at all. In late August and continuing into late October, colchicums produce large, goblet-like blooms in shades of pink and violet. In spring, they have relatively large, broad leaves, which are difficult from a garden design perspective. There are other fall-flowering colchicums at Hillwood that include Colchicum autumnale, C. speciosum, C. byzantinum and the hybrids ‘Lilac Wonder’, ‘The Giant’ and ‘Violet Queen’.

  • Ballon Plant Milkweed (Asclepias physocarpa or Gomphocarpus physocarpus) is a native milkweed of South Africa and is one of the more favored host plants of Monarch butterflies. The flowers are not showy - it is the seed pods that become the real conversation piece when it is covered in them. In 2001 its name was changed from Asclepias physocarpa to Gomphocarpus physocarpus to reflect that it is in the family of African milkweeds

  • Yellow Canna Lily (Canna x generalis 'Tropical Yellow') Spectacular yellow blooms with rose colored flecks provide summer-long tropical flair. Dwarf form with lush blue-green foliage is ideal for mass planting in beds and borders. Beautiful in pots and window boxes for patio or terraces. In cold climates, lift bulbs in fall. Herbaceous perennial.

  • Brassavola orchid (Brassavola nodosa ‘Little Stars’) This charming, night-fragrant orchid is an offspring of the species dubbed the "Queen of the Night"! It is a charming primary hybrid between the famed Central American Brassavola nodosa and the prolific Jamaican native, Brassavola cordata

  • Hybrid Crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia indica) Large shrub or small tree with bright flowers and glossy green leaves that turn red in autumn. The exfoliating turnk bark remains spectacular throught the year. 

  • Gentian Hybrid (Gentiana x 'True Blue') is perennial that was breed to have a longer flowering season. This hybrid gentian is a cross of a Gentiana makinoi hybrid with a Gentiana scabra hybrid to obtain the new Hybrid. The plant is  upright, with well-branched stems and glossy green foliage. At Hillwood it can be found in the rock garden. 

  • Waterlily (Nymphaea spp) There are dozens of species of waterlily, known for their large, oval green leaves and slightly fragrant blooms that float above the water.  The flowers come in many shades: pink, blue, purple, pure white and even yellow.  The common North American white water lily often seen in the wild is Nymphaea odorata.                                                                                                                                                      

     

 

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