What's in Bloom

Set on twenty-five acres adjacent to Rock Creek Park, Hillwood’s Gardens contain a diverse and fascinating array of plants. Spring is here! Each day brings more flowers into bloom.

Creeping Phlox (Phlox stolonifera)

Creeping Phlox (Phlox stolonifera) A mat-forming herbaceous woodland perennial with masses of blue flowers in mid spring

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Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida)

Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida) is a native American tree widely admired for its horizontal form, white or pink blooms

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Van Houtte Spirea (Spiraea x vanhouttei) This mid-sized shrub is covered with clusters of white flowers in mid to late spring

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Purple Spider Azalea (Rhododendron ‘Koromo Shikbu’)

Purple Spider Azalea (Rhododendron ‘Koromo Shikbu’) This mid-season azalea takes its name from the unusual, long, strap-like lavender petals that spread out in a spider-like fashion. 

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Japanese or Fairy Primrose (Primula japonica)

Japanese or Fairy Primrose (Primula japonica)  sports clusters of bright flowers in various shades of pink that rise above wavy, green wrinkled leaves. 

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Burkwood viburnum (Viburnum x burkwoodii)

Burkwood viburnum (Viburnum x burkwoodii) is a large shrub with lustrous dark green leaves and extremely fragrant  white flowers in late March-April. 

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Doublefile Viburnum (Viburnum plicatum forma tomentosum) This viburnum is noted for its horizontal branching pattern and its pure white lacecap blooms in mid-spring.  In fall, its brilliant red fruits are favored by birds, and the red flower stalks extend the plant’s late summer color.  

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Winter is here!

  • Creeping Phlox (Phlox stolonifera) A mat-forming herbaceous perennial with masses of blue, pink, or white flowers in mid spring, native to woodland areas from Pennsylvania to Georgia.  The foliage is fine and evergreen,  especially lovely draped over walls or used as a groundcover.  

  • Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida) is a native American tree widely admired for its horizontal form, white or pink blooms, bright red fruits in fall, distinctive bark, and excellent red to purple fall color  – a true four-season tree.  There are many new cultivars, most resistant to dogwood diseases that have afflicted trees in their native setting.  

  • Doublefile Viburnum (Viburnum plicatum forma tomentosum) This viburnum is noted for its horizontal branching pattern and its pure white lacecap blooms in mid-spring.  In fall, its brilliant red fruits are favored by birds, and the red flower stalks extend the plant’s late summer color.  

  • Purple Spider Azalea (Rhododendron ‘Koromo Shikbu’) This mid-season azalea takes its name from the unusual, long, strap-like lavender petals that spread out in a spider-like fashion.  It’s a semi-dwarf shrub with evergreen leaves and it’s a show-stopper in any garden setting.  

  • Van Houtte Spirea (Spiraea x vanhouttei) This mid-sized shrub is covered with clusters of white flowers in mid to late spring, and it’s particularly showy because of its long, arching stems.  The delicate leaves take on an orange-red color in fall.  It’s particularly effective in the garden when used as a hedge.  

  • Japanese or Fairy Primrose (Primula japonica Flowering in late May to early June, Japanese primrose sports clusters of bright flowers in various shades of pink that rise above wavy, green wrinkled leaves.  They attract butterflies and are happy in moist sites, particularly in the woodland or shade garden. 

  • Burkwood viburnum (Viburnum x burkwoodii) is a large shrub with lustrous dark green leaves that is covered with extremely fragrant clove-scented clusters of pinkish-white flowers in late March-April. The leaves turn orange-red to burgundy in fall, and some cultivars have red to black fruits.  Very effective in the shrub border. 

 

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