New Acquisitions

Hillwood is dedicated to enriching the understanding and appreciation of Russian imperial art that was first sparked by founder Marjorie Merriweather Post when she returned from the Soviet Union in the 1930s with the seeds of her important collection. Adding depth to our Russian Collection, Hillwood has recently purchased three items, ranging from 1873 to 1936. 

Ivan Tshitshelev bracelet, after 1873

Ivan Tshitshelev bracelet, after 1873

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Ivan Tshitshelev earrings, after 1873

Ivan Tshitshelev earrings, after 1873

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Piece from the Discussion of the Stalin Constitution in Uzbekistan Desk Set, 1936-38

Piece from the Discussion of the Stalin Constitution in Uzbekistan Desk Set, 1936-38

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Piece from the Discussion of the Stalin Constitution in Uzbekistan Desk Set, 1936-38

Piece from the Discussion of the Stalin Constitution in Uzbekistan Desk Set, 1936-38

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Jewelry Set by Ivan D. Tshitshelev

This enameled, silver gilt, and gold set, also called a parure, includes a bracelet, brooch, and pair of earrings in the shape of a duga—a yoke used to fasten horses to a traditional Russian horse-drawn sleigh known as a troika—which was one of the most popular Russian folk motifs in the 19th century. Crafted after 1873, each piece is decorated with naturalistic and abstract enameled ornaments inspired by traditional Russian designs. Like real yokes, these are embellished with small bells suspended from chains and ribbons. Ivan D. Tshitshelev was considered to be one of the best jewelers in Moscow in the 1860s and 1870s. Because of their strong Russian spirit, Tshitshelev’s jewels were awarded medals at several national and international fairs and shows in Moscow, St. Petersburg, London, and Paris. 

Stolitsa I Usabdba

Sumptuously illustrated journals published in St. Petersburg from December 1913 to September 1917,  Stolitsa I Usabdba, meaning “capital and home,” profiled the homes and lifestyles of the Russian elite. Providing a wealth of information about the history and architecture of Russian aristocratic estates, these journals explore in richly-illustrated details the final years of imperial Russia, offering a new backdrop for the study and understanding of Hillwood’s imperial collection.

Pieces from the Discussion of the Stalin Constitution in Uzbekistan Desk Set

Natalia Danko’s elaborate porcelain multi-piece desk set commemorating the 1936 Stalin Constitution was designed and produced in the years Marjorie Post and Ambassador Davies lived in Russia. The newly acquired pieces, a pencil tray and an ashtray, complement an inkwell from the same series that Hillwood purchased in 2000. 

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